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Sherene Jeevitha Joseph's show 'Samrohana' a unique healing mix of classical dance and music

Interested in healing and sound science? Sherene Jeevitha Joseph’s solo show Samrohana - Healing at 528Hz at the Esplanade Theatre Studio on September 25 and 26 offers plenty of both.

The show, supported by Singapore's National Arts Council and National Youth Council (Youth ChangeMakers), will be livestreamed for audiences at home as well.
The show, supported by Singapore's National Arts Council and National Youth Council (Youth ChangeMakers), will be livestreamed for audiences at home as well. Photo courtesy: Lijesh Karunakaran

Samrohana, which means healing in Sanskrit, explores the concept of pairing Bharatanatyam with the solfeggio frequency of 528Hz as physical media for science and sound healing. 

Sherene, who will be dancing solo in the show, has roped in Cultural Medallion (1990) recipient and Indian dance veteran Santha Bhaskar for the artistic direction and choreography while the music composition is strung together by Lifetime Achievement and Humanitarian Medallion Dr Ghanavenothan Retnam. 

Sherene, who is a biology teacher as well as a masters’ student at NUS, chanced upon sound science and how hearing music or sound at a frequency can heal and chose 528Hz, known as the miracle frequency, for her show and was inspired to combine it with Bharatanatyam.

"In this period of COVID, it has become very clear that people are always looking for an avenue to align their minds and body. We want to heal physically and mentally. This motivated me to coin all this content into a dance production. To test my own healing and push my own boundaries," she said.

Sherene said she was worried about COVID restrictions would keep the audiences at home, but tickets for the show have already been sold out. Her team overcame the challenges of social distancing and lockdown to put together the show.

"We never know when there will be a show, or when it can be cancelled. Prices of services cannot be compromised, hence we still need to pay for the venue and work done. Not everyone continued with their shows as income and expenditure are at an all-time imbalance now. So, there are months where there are no live shows and when possible, almost everyone is performing at the same time." she said, speaking about the pandemic affecting the performing arts calendar.

The show, supported by Singapore's National Arts Council and National Youth Council (Youth ChangeMakers), will be livestreamed for audiences at home as well.

Sherene, who is a biology teacher at Dunman High School as well as a masters’ student at NUS,
Sherene, a biology teacher as well as a masters’ student at NUS, will be dancing solo in the show, Photo courtesy: Lijesh Karunakaran

"Let us do our part to keep the Arts alive here in SG. It isn’t easy," said Sherene. "Fans need to learn to support digital works as much as live shows. Digital works take a lot of effort too."

She also encouraged fans in Singapore to support performers, especially freelancers and full-timers, when they try to make a comeback.

"Be adaptable to changing times. Keep your grit and strength at heart and find ways to present what you really believe in, in a neat and compelling way. Explore different mediums and ways to present your piece," Sherene advised potential new dancers, signing off.

Author
Tushaar Kuthiala
Tushaar Kuthiala – Associate Editor

Tushaar has extensive experience as a journalist and in founding two start-up newspapers. He has developed editorial models for both copy and content, and has written several articles, news reports on a wide range of topics. He is a graduate of St. Stephen’s College and earned a post-graduate diploma in TV Journalism from the Asian College of Journalism (ACJ), Chennai. He has worked as a special correspondent based in New Delhi with Daily World, an international media organisation. 

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