Movie Review Jawani Jaaneman: Growing up versus growing old

Jawani Jaaneman: Movie Review 

Rating: 3/5           

Language: Hindi

Cast: Saif Ali Khan

           Tabu

           Alaya Furniturewala

Director: Nitin Kakkar

Producers: Jackky Bhagnani, Deepshikha Deshmukh, Saif Ali Khan, Jay Shewakramani

Writers: Hussain Dalal & Abbas Dalal (dialogue)

Music: Songs by Gourov-Roshin, Tanishk Bagchi, Prem - Hardeep

               Score by Ketan Sodha

Production Company: Pooja Entertainment, Black Knight Films,                                                                              Northern Lights Films

Cinematographer: Manoj Kumar Khatoi

Editors: Sachinder Vats, Chandan Arora

A clever introductory dance to the popular ‘Ole Ole’ number from the two and half decade old movie ‘Yeh Dillagi’ sets the tone for Saif’s character who has grown older but never grew up. 

If the shoe fits they say and the shoe (with cleverly added heels) could not have fit better than for Saif Ali Khan, who has definitely matured as an actor in this movie. 

He reprises the role of a footloose, fancy-free, commitment-phobic playboy, as he has done in so many films.  But this time around his ‘past is longer than his future’, so he needs reading glasses to read bottle labels and dyes his hair so often that the hairdresser is his friend and confidante. 

The first half is fun with Jazz (and his swag) who live in a rented apartment in Hounslow as a Punjabi-spouting, pub-hopping, weight- pumping guy who still goes home for weekly meals with his much sober family. 

Tabu, Saif and Alaya as the mom, dad and daughter trio look amazing in Jawani Jaaneman which is almost entirely shot in London. Photo Courtesy: Twitter
Tabu, Saif and Alaya as the mom, dad and daughter trio look amazing in Jawani Jaaneman which is almost entirely shot in London. Photo Courtesy: Twitter

He uses his trademark moves and lines, successfully on most women, even on a girl who is young enough to be his daughter and finds out that the 21-year-old is really his biological daughter and is pregnant out of wedlock to boot, as the trailers show. 

How Jazz is forced to come to terms with reality makes up for the second half of the film and that is where the movie loses its edge. It falls prey to clumsy editing and typical Bollywood ‘masala’ such as Chunkey Pandey’s miraculous recovery from a debilitating stroke, Jazz’s unwelcome advances towards his hairdresser and an unbelievable nappy-changing-grandpa scene. 

Tia (Alaya Furniturewala), granddaughter of Kabir Bedi debuts as Saif’s reel daughter in a role that was first offered to Saif’s real daughter Sara Ali Khan. Photo Courtesy: Twitter
Tia (Alaya Furniturewala), granddaughter of Kabir Bedi debuts as Saif’s reel daughter in a role that was first offered to Saif’s real daughter Sara Ali Khan. Photo Courtesy: Twitter

Tia (Alaya Furniturewala) is very believable as Jazz’s daughter who seeks and shares love with all the people she meets including the landlady in Hounslow.  One does wonder how it would have fared if Sara Ali Khan, who had originally been cast for the role, had reprised the role as his reel-life daughter. 

Saif didn’t mince words while tweeting that his Love Aaj Kal movie posters were better than that of the sequel in which his daughter Sara plays the leading role.  He had earlier admitted that he did not want to really work with Sara as it gets complicated with family adding that he would rather Sara’s career trajectory stay separate from his.  

Tabu looks amazing as the hippy, yoga-loving, Vipassana meditating, phone hating mother. But her character turns out to be a flimsy caricature with nary a glimpse of her acting talent. 

Tabu’s side-kick, who is the boyfriend and father of Tia’s child, is a casting flop especially next to the strong character portrayal of Tia and feels like a damp squib after all the build-up over his coming from Amsterdam to London. 

With a few laugh out loud funny lines and too many club scenes, this coming to age movie is worth a watch mainly for Saif Ali Khan and Alaya. 

 

Author
Lakshmy Iyer
Lakshmy Iyer – Senior Correspondent, ASEAN & Entertainment

Lakshmy has been contributing regularly as a freelance writer since 2012. Her writing has been an amalgamation of the language, literature and rich cultural experiences of India as well as South East Asia. An Instructional Designer by profession she is passionate about lifelong learning. Art is her medium of reflection. She participates in art exhibitions thus contributing to the local art scene and using this platform, supports social causes in Singapore as well.

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