More women researchers and business leaders in Singapore

In 2015, there were 2,740 women research scientists and engineers (RSEs) with PhDs in Singapore. This reflects more than a 50 per cent increase as compared to 1,729 in 2010.

Females made up 29 per cent of all RSEs, which is an increase from 28.4 per cent in 2013. This is according to the National Survey of Research and Development, which was done in 2015. Singapore’s ratio exceeds that of many developed countries and research heavyweights.

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Photo courtesy: womanthology

More women in senior business roles in Singapore

In addition, the proportion of senior business roles held by women in Singapore has risen to 30 per cent in this year 2017 from 26 per cent last year. This is above the average among countries in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, according to a survey by global consultancy Grant Thorton. The survey polled 5,500 businesses in 36 economies worldwide, Todayonline reported on March 8, 2017.

This is due to an improvement in emerging economies in the region – the proportion of senior roles held by women rose to 29 per cent from 26 per cent. But on the other hand, the measure for developed economies in the region was static at 13 per cent.

On a global scale, the data also showed that developing regions continue to lead the charge on diversity, while developed economies lagged behind.

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Photo courtesy: beleaderly

Developed Asia-Pacific economies performed the worst in the region, with just 13 per cent of senior roles held by women. Moreover, 54 per cent of businesses had no women in senior roles.

“The data for major economies is discouraging,” said Lorraine Parkin, Head of Indirect Tax and Supply Chain Service, APAC. “The reasons for this lack of progress are many and varied, and they depend on the culture of individual businesses and the broader culture of the country or region in which they sit.”

“Companies today need to be more productive, more innovative and in many ways more open if they are to grow. Diversity will be key to their success. Those that remain closed are putting themselves at risk of not tapping into their full potential, and losing access to diversity of thinking,” she advised.

Author
Kareyst Lin
Kareyst Lin – Senior Writer

Kareyst has experience in writing about B2B technology for Computerworld Singapore, MIS Asia and CIO Asia; and on government technology for GCIO Asia. Her pet areas are artificial intelligence, Internet of Things and smart cities - these are fueled by her obsession with sci-fi movies and philosophy of mind. 

Sometimes she writes with light. 

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