Study conducted to check efficacy of different DSAs design

A study is being conducted in Singapore regarding the effectiveness of different Designated Smoking Areas (DSAs) designs in reducing smoking activity in the vicinity.

As part of the study, screens made of tempered glass has been put up at two designated smoking areas on the Orchard Road during late June.

There are currently five public DSAs on Orchard Road — situated at Somerset MRT station, Cuppage Terrace, Far East Plaza, Orchard Towers and The Heeren. DSAs have been created to make smokers socially responsible so that they can smoke within a closed premises without disturbing others.

Designated Smoking Area
Designated Smoking Area: Photo courtesy: smokernewsworld

“The setting up of the additional structures at two of the DSAs is a part of this study to assess the effectiveness of different DSA configurations and designs,” said spokesperson of Ministry of Environment and Water Resources (MEWR).

These two areas were chosen as they have a “higher concentration of smokers” among the five public DSAs.

“In particular, the DSA at Far East Plaza is specially sited to allow the smokers to smoke at a location that is away from the nearby bus stop and food and beverage outlets, while  the installation of screens will further reduce the spill-over effect of second-hand smoke around the DSA,” said MEWR spokesperson.

The National Environment Agency (NEA) announced recently that Orchard Road will become a smoke-free area from July 1, 2018 and smoking will be permitted only at designated zones within Singapore’s premier shopping belt.

Also read: Orchard Road area to become smoking free from July 1 next year: NEA

An “advisory approach” will be taken in the first three months after the no-smoking ban kicks in. Those caught smoking in public areas will receive only verbal warnings between July 1 and Sept 30, said the NEA. However, from Oct 1 next year, errant smokers can be fined up to SGD1,000.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

Comments