Singapore’s first supercar Dendrobium to debut at Geneva Motor Show

Singapore’s first home-grown electric supercar Dendrobium will make its debut at the Geneva Motor Show on March 7.

The car has been developed by local company Vanda Electrics and Williams Advanced Engineering-famed for its work in Formula One racing.

Singapore's first electric supercar Dendrobium will be showcased to the world at Geneva Motor Show. Photo courtesy: Youtube

Larissa Tan, CEO of Vanda Electrics, said, “Dendrobium is the first Singaporean hypercar and the culmination of Vanda Electrics’ expertise in design and technology. We are delighted to be working with Williams Advanced Engineering, world-leaders in aerodynamics, composites and electric powertrains and Bridge of Weir Leather Company, makers of the finest, lowest-carbon leather in the world.”  

“The Dendrobium is inspired by nature and rooted in technology, a marriage of design and engineering – I can’t wait to reveal the car to the world in March,” she continued.

Technical details
Technical details for the Dendrobium have been kept at a minimum thus far, however, it was reported last year that the car could be propelled by four Yasa electric motors — with a total output of 1,500 horsepower and 4,000 newton-meters of torque. The car reportedly can hit 100 km/h from a standstill in under 2.6 seconds and hit a top speed of 400 km/h.

Looks
In terms of styling, the Dendrobium is outlandish with a pointed nose, large wheel arches, and a fighter jet-like cockpit. It also gets automatic roof and doors, which open in a “synchronised, theatrical manner, resembling a fully-opened dendrobium flower, a genus of orchids native to Singapore.” The car is named after a Singapore orchid.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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