Singapore's fifth NEWater plant opens at Changi

Fifth Newater plant has been launched at Changi, Singapore. It is the first to be jointly developed by a foreign and a local company. Already in operation, the $170 million plant increases Singapore's Newater capacity from 30 to 40 per cent of the Republic's water demand of 430 million gallons per day.

Masagos Zulkifli, Singapore’s Minister for Environment and Water Resources( fifth from right) and senior officials at the opening of BEWG-UESH NEWater Plant at Changi. Photo courtesy: PUB

The BEWG-UESH Newater Plant, which spans 49,000 sq m, or 7.5 football fields, is able to produce 50 million gallons of Newater a day, enough water to fill 92 Olympic- size swimming pools, and will supply water to PUB for 25 years.

Masagos Zulkifli, Minister for the Environment and Water Resources, while launching the plant said, “The launch of this plant is another important page in our water story. I congratulate Beijing Enterprises Water Group Limited, UES Holdings Pte Ltd, and PUB on this achievement. This plant is one of the many major pieces of infrastructure that the Singapore Government will be developing in the coming years. In the context of rising uncertainties, such as the drying up of Linggiu Reservoir, and rising costs of production and conveyance, we need to take necessary measures to strengthen water supply and sustainability. I also urge all to continue to use water prudently.”

Ng Joo Hee, Chief Executive of PUB, said, “Reuse is a plank of Singapore’s water strategy. In our minds, the H2O molecule is never lost and water is an endlessly reusable resource. Used water can always be reclaimed and retreated so that it can be consumed again. Singapore leads the world in this. Today, with this newest plant, we have enough NEWater capacity to supply 40 per cent of Singapore’s daily demand.”

This water plant increases Singapore's Newater capacity from 30 to 40 per cent. Photo courtesy: PUB

The new plant is jointly developed by Chinese consortium BEWG International, local company UES Holdings and national water agency PUB. The four other Newater plants are located at Bedok, Kranji, Ulu Pandan and Changi . At each of the Newater plants, treated used water first goes through microfiltration where membranes filter out larger particles. The filtered water - containing dissolved salts and organic molecules - is then put through the reverse osmosis process where a semi-permeable membrane removes the tiny molecules that remain. Next, it is further disinfected using ultraviolet light as an added safety measure to kill any organisms that might remain.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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