Singapore to be draped in LUSH greenery

Singapore is going to launch an ambitious greenery programme with more urban farms and communal rooftop food gardens. This was announced by Desmond Lee, Second Minister for National Development, at the opening of greenery and landscape design event GreenUrbanScape Asia today.

More urban farms and  rooftop gardens will be visible in Singapore with 'LUSH' programme.
More urban farms and rooftop gardens will be visible in Singapore with 'LUSH' programme. Photo courtesy: NParks

The programme christened ‘The Landscaping for Urban Spaces and High-Rises’ (LUSH) aims to replace greenery lost during a building’s development or redevelopment. This will be enhanced to improve both the quality and quantity of urban greenery.

The programme will also encourage property developers to house urban gardens and communal rooftop gardens in their buildings, and increase landscaping on walls and roofs - which can also help lower ambient temperature.

Lee said, “Such features have been gaining popularity in our urban landscape, as many Singaporeans have a keen interest in farming and gardening.”

He added, “The enhanced LUSH programme will encourage more people to take up urban farming and gardening near their offices and homes, while allowing developers to better utilise rooftop space.”

The enhanced LUSH programme will encourage more Singaporean people to take up urban farming and gardening near their offices and homes.
The enhanced LUSH programme will encourage more Singaporean people to take up urban farming and gardening near their offices and homes. Photo courtesy: challenge.gov.sg

The programme was first  introduced in 2009 and the scheme  has contributed to more than 130 hectares of greenery so far, or the equivalent of about 210 football fields.

During the programme, the Minister also highlighted a new study, which found 110 species of birds and butterflies on roof gardens across the island, representing 13 and 18 per cent of the total number of bird and butterfly species in Singapore.

The study was jointly conducted by the National Parks Board and National University of Singapore at 30 rooftop gardens over 20 months, the study also found 24 species of rare or uncommon birds and butterflies.

The Minister said, “This joint study suggests that with careful design planning, urban roof gardens can play host to a diverse range of wildlife, and help complement the equally important work of natural habitat conservation and enhancement.”

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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