Singapore takes measures to protect public spaces from hostile vehicle attacks

In view of the increasing threats of terrorism involving vehicles driven into crowds, Singapore is mulling of placing bollards and security barriers in public spaces. These are among different measures being undertaken by the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) and other agencies to beef up security measures, particularly to guard against hostile vehicle attacks, said Desmond Lee, Second Minister for Home Affairs in Parliament today.

Singapore is considering of placing bollards and security barriers to protect public spaces from hostile vehicle attacks.
Singapore is considering of placing bollards and security barriers to protect public spaces from hostile vehicle attacks. Photo courtesy: avonbarrier.com

He was responding to queries from Members of Parliament (MPs) on measures that Singapore is undertaking to guard itself against terrorist attacks as seen in Europe.

The Minister said, “The review will consider how effective the security measures are in addressing the threat, how these measures look and fit in its surroundings and whether it will restrict day-to-day use of the area.”

Desmond Lee, Second Minister for Home Affairs.
Desmond Lee, Second Minister for Home Affairs. Photo courtesy: pmo.gov.sg

Lee said, “We could try and fortify the entire country. But this is not a sensible or practical approach. We will have to strike a balance between enhancing security, and disrupting day-to-day activities through the imposition of curbs and restrictions, which will inconvenience the public.”

He also added that authorities seriously take these difficult security challenges.

It is believed that that MHA has engaged with bollard suppliers and other players in the security industry on the possibility of beefing up the security infrastructure of public spaces where crowds gather. These areas could include Boat Quay, Clarke Quay, Speakers’ Corner and other areas.

In addition to this, a new Infrastructure Protection Act is also on the anvil as it will be introduced in Parliament later this year to better protect critical infrastructure and large-scale developments.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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