Singapore dollar climbs to a new high against Malaysian ringgit

Singaporean dollar has climbed to a new high against Malaysian ringgit on January 18 early morning, reaching as high as S$1 to RM3.1474, showed Bloomberg data. But the exchange rate soon eased back to S$1 to RM3.1379.

Most Asian currencies rose on Tuesday in a move that traders said was likely driven by position squaring ahead of a series of potentially market-moving events over the next several days.

On January 18 morning, Singaporean dollar rose to a new high against Malaysian ringgit. Photo courtesy: dollarsandsense.sg

Elaborating on the development, Philip Wee, DBS Senior Currency Strategist said, “The hike in the Singapore dollar against the ringgit on Tuesday spoke more of the strength of the Singapore currency rather than significant weakening in the ringgit. According to Reuters data, the Singapore dollar gained 0.6 per cent against the US dollar on Tuesday, while the ringgit rose by 0.01 per cent.

Analysts at Citi said they would expect the Singapore dollar to outperform in any bouts of US dollar weakness.

“In Asia, our FX flows data suggest that real money investors’ extreme short SGD position could be another casualty of the ongoing position squeeze, or if conviction in the long USD view softens even temporarily,” they wrote in a research note.

Asian currencies have risen broadly so far in January, with some of those gains coming after a news conference by US president elect Donald Trump last week offered little clarity on his fiscal policies and disappointed dollar bulls.

On Tuesday, the US dollar took another tumble after Trump told The Wall Street Journal that he favoured a weaker dollar.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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