Pramila Jayapal becomes first Indian-American woman to be elected to House of Representatives

Pramila Jaypal first Indian American woman to enter House of Representatives Photo courtesy: Pramilaforcongress.com

Pramila Jayapal has become the first Indian-American woman to get elected to the House of Representatives. With Kamala Harris in the Senate and Pramila Jaypal in the House of Representatives, Indian American women have made a resounding entry into American politics.

51-year-old Jayapal got 57 per cent of the votes from Washington State, leaving behind her rival Brady Walkinshaw who secured 43 per cent votes. Jayapal was “one of the first 2016 congressional candidates” to earn an endorsement from Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who said, “When you think of the political revolution, I want you to think about Pramila.”

In a statement via Twitter on Tuesday, Jayapal wrote, "Thank you for your support, faith, and confidence, and for standing up for the values of our country — values that welcomed me as a 16-year-old immigrant and let me serve as the next Congresswoman from the 7th Congressional District."

Jayapal, former banker turned activist advocated for the rights of immigrants, women, and people of colour. She founded "Hate Free Zone" after the September 11 attacks in 2001 as an advocacy group for Arabs, Muslims, and South Asian Americans targeted in the wake of the attacks. It changed its name to "OneAmerica" in 2008.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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