New vaccine against salmonella infection developed

Salmonella is a deadly bacterium responsible for one of the most common food-borne illnesses in the world. Photo courtesy : Youtube

Scientists, including one of Indian origin, have developed a new oral vaccine against Salmonella in United States. The scientist of Indian origin is Ashok Chopra, professor at University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) in the US.

Salmonella is a deadly bacterium responsible for one of the most common food-borne illnesses in the world.

“Oral vaccination is simplest and least invasive way to protect people against salmonella infection. Taking this vaccine by mouth also has the added advantage of using the same pathway that salmonella uses to wreak havoc on the digestive system,” scientists said.

"In the current study, we analysed the immune responses of mice that received the vaccination by mouth as well as how they responded to a lethal dose of salmonella," said Ashok Chopra.

Ashok Chopra, professor at UTMB. Photo courtesy: UTMB.org

"We found that the orally administered vaccines produced strong immunity against salmonella, showing their potential for future use in people," said Chopra.

There is no vaccine currently available for salmonella poisoning. Antibiotics are the first choice in treating salmonella infections, but the fact that some strains of salmonella are quickly developing antibiotic resistance is a serious concern.

Salmonella is responsible for one of the most common food-borne illnesses in the world. In the US alone, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are about 1.4 million cases with 15,000 hospitalisations and 400 deaths each year.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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