Indian-Americans face discrimination in daily lives in US: Survey

Highlighting the issue of racial profiling, Indian-Americans say that they have faced discrimination in many areas in their daily lives in the US, according to a new survey about Asian-Americans.

Overall, Asian-Americans report numerous personal experiences of discrimination
Overall, Asian-Americans report numerous personal experiences of discrimination. Photo courtesy: Wikimedia

The report released this week is part of a series titled ‘Discrimination in America’ which is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, agencies reported.

Overall, Asian-Americans report numerous personal experiences of discrimination, across many areas of life. In the context of institutional forms of discrimination, a quarter or more of Asian Americans say they have been personally discriminated against because they are Asian when applying for jobs (27%), when being paid equally or considered for promotions (25%), and when trying to rent or buy housing (25%).

About 1 in 10 Asian-Americans report that they or a family member have been unfairly stopped or treated by the police because they are Asian. But on the basis of ethnicity, Indian-Americans reported unfair police stops or treatment eight times more often than Chinese-Americans, it said.

Indian-American survey.
Courtesy: Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health

Indian-Americans are significantly more likely (17%) than Chinese Americans (2%) to say they or a family member have been unfairly stopped or treated by the police because they are Asian, the results of the survey showed.

"Our poll shows that Asian-American families have the highest average income among the groups we have surveyed, and yet the poll still finds that Asian-Americans experience persistent discrimination in housing, jobs, and at college," said Robert Blendon, Professor at Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, who co-directed the survey.

"Over the course of our series, we are seeing again and again that income is not a shield from discrimination," Blendon said.

Prof Robert Blendon.
Prof Robert Blendon. Photo courtesy: HSPH

According to immigration status, the survey said non-immigrant Asian-Americans are more than three times as likely to say they have experienced violence because they are Asian and more than twice as likely to say they have been threatened or non-sexually harassed because they are Asian.

Non-immigrant Asian-Americans are significantly more likely than immigrant Asian Americans to say they have experienced these forms of discrimination, the findings said.

A quarter or more of Asian-Americans in the survey said they experienced anti-Asian discrimination in employment and when seeking housing.

The survey was conducted between January 26 and April 9, 2017, among a nationally representative sample of 3,453 adults aged 18 or older.

Author
Tushaar Kuthiala
Tushaar Kuthiala – Senior Writer

Tushaar has five years experience as a journalist in founding two start-up newspapers. He worked as a special correspondent based in New Delhi with Daily World, an international media organisation. He enjoys reading and writing fiction in his spare time.

 

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