Biggest full moon on Singapore sky on Nov 14

View of full moon on Singapore skyline Photo courtesy : metro.co.uk

Moon has always been the fancy of poets, writers to express the beauty of their beloveds and beautiful women but now this celestial body would come closest to Earth on November 14 in its full splendour and that too after a gap of 68 years after 1948. People of Singapore can view Moon in its biggest form on November 14 at 9.52 pm. (  1.52 pm , GMT time ).

View of full moon at the tip of Marina Bay Sands Spypark in Singapore. Photo courtesy : nationalgeographic.com

The full moon on Nov 14 will be the biggest since 1948, say scientists. It will also be the closest and brightest supermoon in 2016, astronomy professor Robert Berman told Space.com.

The Nov 14 moon is the closest full moon to Earth to date in the 21st century, said United States space agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), making it a "supermoon".

A supermoon refers broadly to when the full moon is closer to the planet than average as it orbits Earth. The full moon will not come this close to Earth again for almost another 20 years - until Nov 25, 2034.

View of full moon on a beach. Photo courtesy: yoganonymous

A supermoon can be as much as 14 per cent bigger and 30 per cent brighter than a full moon at its furthest from Earth on its orbit.

The Nov 14 supermoon comes in the middle of three supermoons occurring towards the end of 2016.The first was on Oct 16 and the other will be on Dec 14.

The difference in appearance between a supermoon and a regular full moon depends largely on where a person is looking at it from.If the moon is high above the horizon from one's perspective and there are no buildings to compare it to, it may not appear larger than usual.

On the other hand, the moon can look unnaturally large and closer to the horizon when viewed through trees, buildings or other foreground objects.

While this is an optical illusion, Nasa states that it does not take away from the experience.

Author
Ashraf Jamal
Ashraf Jamal – Senior Writer

Ashraf Jamal brings a rare depth to writing equipped with a degree in journalism, a postgraduate degree in political science, and a degree in law from the Allahabad University. His experience includes editing and publishing the Northern India Patrika and writing for Times of India for almost a decade covering just about any topic under the sun including NRIs and Indian diaspora.

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